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Over the years, Dr. Bluestein has seen the toxic and corrosive effects of perfectionism on people’s thinking, their bodies, their relationships, their work, and their sense of worth: now she exposes the truth:

book-cover

book-cover

Over the years, Dr. Bluestein has seen the toxic and corrosive effects of perfectionism on people’s thinking, their bodies, their relationships, their work, and their sense of worth: now she exposes the truth:

book-cover

Over the years, Dr. Bluestein has seen the toxic and corrosive effects of perfectionism on people’s thinking, their bodies, their relationships, their work, and their sense of worth: now she exposes the truth:
When Dr. Jane Bluestein would tell someone that she just finished writing a book on perfectionism, the common reaction was a blank stare followed by the question, ‘What’s wrong with perfectionism?’ Indeed, most people mistakenly confuse perfectionism with a healthy striving for excellence but there is a big difference. One can lead to great achievement (or at least great learning) and the other is a psychological wound, the voice of the inner critic that screams ‘failure,’ ‘loser,’ or ‘fraud,’ regardless of the authenticity of our efforts, progress, or success.

book-cover

Over the years, Dr. Bluestein has seen the toxic and corrosive effects of perfectionism on people’s thinking, their bodies, their relationships, their work, and their sense of worth: now she exposes the truth:
When Dr. Jane Bluestein would tell someone that she just finished writing a book on perfectionism, the common reaction was a blank stare followed by the question, ‘What’s wrong with perfectionism?’ Indeed, most people mistakenly confuse perfectionism with a healthy striving for excellence but there is a big difference. One can lead to great achievement (or at least great learning) and the other is a psychological wound, the voice of the inner critic that screams ‘failure,’ ‘loser,’ or ‘fraud,’ regardless of the authenticity of our efforts, progress, or success.

Over the years, Dr. Bluestein has seen the toxic and corrosive effects of perfectionism on people’s thinking, their bodies, their relationships, their work, and their sense of worth: now she exposes the truth:
When Dr. Jane Bluestein would tell someone that she just finished writing a book on perfectionism, the common reaction was a blank stare followed by the question, ‘What’s wrong with perfectionism?’ Indeed, most people mistakenly confuse perfectionism with a healthy striving for excellence but there is a big difference. One can lead to great achievement (or at least great learning) and the other is a psychological wound, the voice of the inner critic that screams ‘failure,’ ‘loser,’ or ‘fraud,’ regardless of the authenticity of our efforts, progress, or success.

book-cover

book-cover

Over the years, Dr. Bluestein has seen the toxic and corrosive effects of perfectionism on people’s thinking, their bodies, their relationships, their work, and their sense of worth: now she exposes the truth:

When Dr. Jane Bluestein would tell someone that she just finished writing a book on perfectionism, the common reaction was a blank stare followed by the question, ‘What’s wrong with perfectionism?’ Indeed, most people mistakenly confuse perfectionism with a healthy striving for excellence but there is a big difference. One can lead to great achievement (or at least great learning) and the other is a psychological wound, the voice of the inner critic that screams ‘failure,’ ‘loser,’ or ‘fraud,’ regardless of the authenticity of our efforts, progress, or success.

book-cover

Over the years, Dr. Bluestein has seen the toxic and corrosive effects of perfectionism on people’s thinking, their bodies, their relationships, their work, and their sense of worth: now she exposes the truth:

When Dr. Jane Bluestein would tell someone that she just finished writing a book on perfectionism, the common reaction was a blank stare followed by the question, ‘What’s wrong with perfectionism?’ Indeed, most people mistakenly confuse perfectionism with a healthy striving for excellence but there is a big difference. One can lead to great achievement (or at least great learning) and the other is a psychological wound, the voice of the inner critic that screams ‘failure,’ ‘loser,’ or ‘fraud,’ regardless of the authenticity of our efforts, progress, or success.

Over the years, Dr. Bluestein has seen the toxic and corrosive effects of perfectionism on people’s thinking, their bodies, their relationships, their work, and their sense of worth: now she exposes the truth:

When Dr. Jane Bluestein would tell someone that she just finished writing a book on perfectionism, the common reaction was a blank stare followed by the question, ‘What’s wrong with perfectionism?’ Indeed, most people mistakenly confuse perfectionism with a healthy striving for excellence but there is a big difference. One can lead to great achievement (or at least great learning) and the other is a psychological wound, the voice of the inner critic that screams ‘failure,’ ‘loser,’ or ‘fraud,’ regardless of the authenticity of our efforts, progress, or success.

book-cover

Over the years, Dr. Bluestein has seen the toxic and corrosive effects of perfectionism on people’s thinking, their bodies, their relationships, their work, and their sense of worth: now she exposes the truth:

When Dr. Jane Bluestein would tell someone that she just finished writing a book on perfectionism, the common reaction was a blank stare followed by the question, ‘What’s wrong with perfectionism?’ Indeed, most people mistakenly confuse perfectionism with a healthy striving for excellence but there is a big difference. One can lead to great achievement (or at least great learning) and the other is a psychological wound, the voice of the inner critic that screams ‘failure,’ ‘loser,’ or ‘fraud,’ regardless of the authenticity of our efforts, progress, or success.

Over the years, Dr. Bluestein has seen the toxic and corrosive effects of perfectionism on people’s thinking, their bodies, their relationships, their work, and their sense of worth: now she exposes the truth:

book-cover

Over the years, Dr. Bluestein has seen the toxic and corrosive effects of perfectionism on people’s thinking, their bodies, their relationships, their work, and their sense of worth: now she exposes the truth:

Over the years, Dr. Bluestein has seen the toxic and corrosive effects of perfectionism on people’s thinking, their bodies, their relationships, their work, and their sense of worth: now she exposes the truth:

book-cover

Over the years, Dr. Bluestein has seen the toxic and corrosive effects of perfectionism on people’s thinking, their bodies, their relationships, their work, and their sense of worth: now she exposes the truth:

book-cover

Over the years, Dr. Bluestein has seen the toxic and corrosive effects of perfectionism on people’s thinking, their bodies, their relationships, their work, and their sense of worth: now she exposes the truth:

book-cover

About Dr. Bluestein

Jane's-photoWhen Dr. Jane Bluestein would tell someone that she just finished writing a book on perfectionism, the common reaction was a blank stare followed by the question, ‘What’s wrong with perfectionism?’ Indeed, most people mistakenly confuse perfectionism with a healthy striving for excellence―but there is a big difference. One can lead to great achievement (or at least great learning) and the other is a psychological wound, the voice of the inner critic that screams ‘failure,’ ‘loser,’ or ‘fraud,’ regardless of the authenticity of our efforts, progress, or success.

About Dr. Bluestein

Jane's-photoWhen Dr. Jane Bluestein would tell someone that she just finished writing a book on perfectionism, the common reaction was a blank stare followed by the question, ‘What’s wrong with perfectionism?’ Indeed, most people mistakenly confuse perfectionism with a healthy striving for excellence―but there is a big difference. One can lead to great achievement (or at least great learning) and the other is a psychological wound, the voice of the inner critic that screams ‘failure,’ ‘loser,’ or ‘fraud,’ regardless of the authenticity of our efforts, progress, or success.

Over the years, Dr. Bluestein has seen the toxic and corrosive effects of perfectionism on people’s thinking, their bodies, their relationships, their work, and their sense of worth: now she exposes the truth:

book-cover

About Dr. Bluestein

Jane's-photoWhen Dr. Jane Bluestein would tell someone that she just finished writing a book on perfectionism, the common reaction was a blank stare followed by the question, ‘What’s wrong with perfectionism?’ Indeed, most people mistakenly confuse perfectionism with a healthy striving for excellence, but there is a big difference.

One can lead to great achievement (or at least great learning) and the other is a psychological wound, the voice of the inner critic that screams ‘failure,’ ‘loser,’ or ‘fraud,’ regardless of the authenticity of our efforts, progress, or success.

About Dr. Bluestein

Jane's-photoWhen Dr. Jane Bluestein would tell someone that she just finished writing a book on perfectionism, the common reaction was a blank stare followed by the question, ‘What’s wrong with perfectionism?’ Indeed, most people mistakenly confuse perfectionism with a healthy striving for excellence, but there is a big difference.

One can lead to great achievement (or at least great learning) and the other is a psychological wound, the voice of the inner critic that screams ‘failure,’ ‘loser,’ or ‘fraud,’ regardless of the authenticity of our efforts, progress, or success.

Over the years, Dr. Bluestein has seen the toxic and corrosive effects of perfectionism on people’s thinking, their bodies, their relationships, their work, and their sense of worth: now she exposes the truth:

book-cover

About Dr. Bluestein

Jane's-photoWhen Dr. Jane Bluestein would tell someone that she just finished writing a book on perfectionism, the common reaction was a blank stare followed by the question, ‘What’s wrong with perfectionism?’ Indeed, most people mistakenly confuse perfectionism with a healthy striving for excellence, but there is a big difference.

One can lead to great achievement (or at least great learning) and the other is a psychological wound, the voice of the inner critic that screams ‘failure,’ ‘loser,’ or ‘fraud,’ regardless of the authenticity of our efforts, progress, or success.

Over the years, Dr. Bluestein has seen the toxic and corrosive effects of perfectionism on people’s thinking, their bodies, their relationships, their work, and their sense of worth: now she exposes the truth:

book-cover

About Dr. Bluestein

Jane's-photoWhen Dr. Jane Bluestein would tell someone that she just finished writing a book on perfectionism, the common reaction was a blank stare followed by the question, ‘What’s wrong with perfectionism?’ Indeed, most people mistakenly confuse perfectionism with a healthy striving for excellence, but there is a big difference.

One can lead to great achievement (or at least great learning) and the other is a psychological wound, the voice of the inner critic that screams ‘failure,’ ‘loser,’ or ‘fraud,’ regardless of the authenticity of our efforts, progress, or success.

Over the years, Dr. Bluestein has seen the toxic and corrosive effects of perfectionism on people’s thinking, their bodies, their relationships, their work, and their sense of worth: now she exposes the truth:

book-cover

About Dr. Bluestein

Jane's-photoWhen Dr. Jane Bluestein would tell someone that she just finished writing a book on perfectionism, the common reaction was a blank stare followed by the question, ‘What’s wrong with perfectionism?’ Indeed, most people mistakenly confuse perfectionism with a healthy striving for excellence, but there is a big difference.

One can lead to great achievement (or at least great learning) and the other is a psychological wound, the voice of the inner critic that screams ‘failure,’ ‘loser,’ or ‘fraud,’ regardless of the authenticity of our efforts, progress, or success.